Recycled Materials Transformed Into Sculptural Masks

Recycled Materials Transformed Into Sculptural Masks

Protection. Fashion. Power. Culture. Identity and more…

Word splash starting with the word Helmets

Word splash starting with the word Helmets

These are just some of the words students came up with during our warm up Word splash exercise for the mask making workshops I am bringing to elementary school students in Delaware through the DIAE (Delaware Institute of Arts in Education.) Using the word Helmet, rather than Mask for this exercise opened up possibilities for students to consider form, function and design when they make their own pieces during our 3 sessions together.

A transformed lacrosse helmet becomes a work of art at a Professional Development Workshop at University of Delaware with the DIAE

A transformed lacrosse helmet becomes a work of art at a Professional Development Workshop at University of Delaware with the DIAE

Building on a Professional Development Workshop I led over the summer On the African Presence in Mexico as seen through their Masks students saw and discussed a power point showing different types of headgear in our contemporary culture.

The ubiquitous cereal box is transformed by a 4th grade student.

The ubiquitous cereal box is transformed by a 4th grade student.

Working with recycled boxes to create the structure of their headpieces, the students have been using innovative ways to problem solve as they figure out how to create their sculptural wearable art.

This student has already moved forward in decorating her mask, here with added elements and colorful duct tape

This student has already moved forward in decorating her mask, here with added elements and colorful duct tape

To bring the experience full circle, Janet Broske, Curator of Collections at University of Delaware will be bringing masks from Africa and Mexico from the collection to share with the students.

Examples of African and Mexican masks from the University of Delaware collection

Examples of African and Mexican masks from the University of Delaware collection

It’ll be exciting to see the finished student work- and the threads that connect them to time and places other than their own.

 

7 Comments

  1. Linda M. Merry
    February 8, 2016

    Nanci, would you like to borrow a couple of masks from Bali and 1 from Mexico (beaded by the Indians) to show in addition to those from UD? Or perhaps you are finished with this project? Very, very cool and creative.

    Reply
    • Nanci Hersh
      February 9, 2016

      Thank you Linda for your generous offer. Would love to see them. Right now we are making our own and will do some guided looking to find our aha! moments and connections when we see the masks from Africa and Mexico.Let’s talk.

      Reply
      • Linda M. Merry
        February 9, 2016

        Yes, let’s talk. It’s been forever.

        As you might expect from a veterinarian, the beaded mask is an incredibly colorful jaguar and one of the Bali masks is a wild, wild tiger. The other Bali mask is a very serene woman’s mask. No contrast there!

        Tom is recovering from a major surgery on his right wrist. so, we are mostly home and reachable on the home number.

        Reply
  2. Liza
    February 8, 2016

    Such amazing work you inspire, Nanci!

    Reply
    • Nanci Hersh
      February 9, 2016

      Thank you Liza, it is inspiring to see what the students come up with when given the opportunity.

      Reply
  3. cathymbennett0305@gmail.com
    February 9, 2016

    These are great Nancy! Such great ideas from the students. Too Bad we aren’t closer. I’ve got Lots of Mexican and African Masks.
    Great fun for all!

    Reply
    • Nanci Hersh
      February 9, 2016

      Would love to see photos Cathy! You probably have lots of wonderful things from all your travels.

      Reply

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